Upper-Level Courses


The Department of Chemistry is planning to offer the following 300- and 400-level courses. This information should be regarded as tentative and subject to revision. Details about upcoming Special Topics offerings are listed below. Details about about registrations procedures for our research-based 44X courses may also be found here.

Term 1 (September 2018)

Course Title
 Instructor
 Notes
BIOC 310
Plant Chemistry
Susan Murch
 
BIOC 420X
CHEM 422X 
Special Topics in Biochemistry: Molecular and Cellular Biophysics
Isaac Li
See description below
CHEM 302
Atmospheric Environmental Chemistry
Karen Perry
 
CHEM 304
Advanced Physical Chemistry
David Jack
 
CHEM 317
Environmental Organic Chemistry
Jeff Therrin  
CHEM 330
Advanced Organic Chemistry
Frederic Menard
 
CHEM 333
Spectroscopic Techniques in Organic Chemistry
Ed Neeland
 
BIOC 338
Organometallic Chemistry
Kevin Smith
 
CHEM 422Z
Special Topics in Chemistry: Computational Chemistry 
Gino DiLabio
 
CHEM 434 
Methods in Bioanalytical Chemistry 
Wesley Zandberg
 
BIOC 425 
Biocatalysis
Kirsten Wolthers
CHEM 461
Advanced Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
Karen Perry
 
CHEM 464
Advanced Chemistry Laboratory in Physical Chemistry
James Bailey

BIOC 448
Directed Studies in Biochemistry
  See registration procedures below
BIOC 449
Honours Thesis in Biochemistry
  See registration procedures below
CHEM 447 Directed Studies in Chemistry Literature and Data Analysis
  See registration procedures below
CHEM 448
Directed Studies in Chemistry
  See registration procedures below
CHEM 449
Honours Thesis in Chemistry
  See registration procedures below

Term 2 (January 2019)

Course Title
 Instructor
 Notes
BIOC 403
CHEM 403
Enzymology Kirsten Wolthers
 
CHEM 301
Aqueous Environmental Chemistry
Karen Perry
 
CHEM 305
Biophysical Chemistry
David Jack

CHEM 311
Instrumental Analytical Chemistry
Wesley Zandberg
 
CHEM 312
Introduction to Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
David Jack
 
CHEM 335
Bioinorganic Chemistry
Stephen McNeil
 
CHEM 422K
Solar Energy Conversion
Robert Godin 
 
CHEM 462
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
Jeff Therrien
 
CHEM 463
Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Ed Neeland

BIOC 448 Directed Studies in Biochemistry
  See registration procedures below
BIOC 449
Honours Thesis in Biochemistry
  See registration procedures below
CHEM 447   Directed Studies in Chemistry Literature and Data Analysis
  See registration procedures below
CHEM 448
Directed Studies in Chemistry
  See registration procedures below
CHEM 449
Honours Thesis in Chemistry
  See registration procedures below

Special Topics Courses (BIOC 420 / CHEM 422 / CHEM 465)

The Department of Chemistry is planning to offer the following Special Topics course offerings in the W2018 session. The following course descriptions should be considered tentative. More information regarding these courses will be provided as it becomes available.

2018 Term 1

CHEM 422Z – Computational Chemistry for Experimentalists: This course will provide an overview of modern quantum mechanical (QM) methods that are used to calculate chemical structures, thermodynamic properties and reaction barriers. Students will develop their understanding of QM methods used in research through a combination of lectures and hands-on computer-based exercises. An end-of-term project will take the place of a traditional final exam. Participants will have the opportunity to select to topic of their project work.

BIOC 425 – Biocatalysis: Biotechnological application of enzymes and whole cell catalysts for the synthesis of biofuels, pharmaceuticals, and other fine chemicals. Emphasis on enzymes used for organic synthesis, protein and metabolic engineering, and immobilization strategies.

CHEM 434 – Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry: Gas, liquid, and supercritical fluid chromatography. Mass spectrometry: ionization processes, mass analyses, ion molecule reactions, fragmentation processes.

2018 Term 2

CHEM 422K – Solar Energy Conversion: This course will cover the present-day technologies used to harness the energy of sunlight. Students will become familiar with the key processes of the 3 main types of solar energy conversion: solar thermal, photocatalysis, and photovoltaics. The limitations and current challenges of leading technologies will be discussed. At the end of the course, students will be able to critically assess the performance of commercial and published devices, and propose paths for improvement.

CHEM 422X/BIOC 420X – Cellular Biophysics: Biophysical principles behind molecular and cellular processes. Topics include: protein folding, DNA mechanics, molecular self-assembly, molecular motor, systems biology, cell motility, mechanobiology, cell sensing, biomolecular networks, and biological pattern formation. Tools and techniques used at the frontier of nanoscience and nano-bio-technology will be introduced including: molecular biosensors, aptamers, DNA-origami, single-molecule biophysics, super-resolution microscopy, and DNA sequencing.

CHEM 424 – Organometallic Catalysis: An advanced course describing selected recent developments in catalytic applications of organo-transition metal chemistry.

CHEM 447 (Directed Literature Study), BIOC/CHEM 448 (Directed Studies), and BIOC/CHEM 449 (Honours Thesis)

All BIOC/CHEM 44X courses involve participation in a research study under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Students should be familiar with the nature, expectations, scheduling time frames, and prerequisites for these courses. It is recommended that these courses not be taken until a student’s final year of study. Students expecting to meet the prerequisites and interested in taking these courses should seek potential faculty supervisors to discuss their interest in possible research topics, generally in the summer or term before the project begins. The Chemistry Department Research Page offers an overview of faculty research interests and links to more details on faculty research projects.|

CHEM 447: A student in Chemistry 447 will undertake either a comprehensive review of the current literature on a chemistry research topic in order to provide an overview of its current state of research and understanding, or a hypothesis-driven investigation and analysis of existing data contained in a chemistry database. Depending on the topic being studied, the student will gain experience in some or all of the following areas: critical evaluation of research literature; analysis, summary and interpretation of published findings and data; data mining and meta-analysis; synthesis and proper citation of key results from multiple sources; manuscript preparation and publication.
Scheduling: Chem 447 may only be taken for 3 credits, either for one semester in Winter session or over both semesters in Summer session.
Prerequisites: fourth year standing (minimum of 78 credits) in the Chemistry Major or the Environmental Chemistry Major with a minimum grade average of 72%, and approval of both the Chemistry Curriculum Committee and a faculty supervisor.

BIOC / CHEM 448: A student in Chemistry or Biochemistry 448 will gain experience in the design, execution, interpretation, and reporting of original laboratory research in one or more of the major sub-disciplines of chemistry (analytical, biochemical, inorganic, organic, physical, theoretical). A written thesis and poster describing the results of the research project will form the bulk of the grade assessment, and will require the generation, interpretation, and communication of a body of results beyond that seen in undergraduate laboratory courses. Students will attend all departmental research seminars while enrolled in the course.
Scheduling: CHEM and BIOC 448 may be taken either for 3 credits (over one semester in Winter session or over two semesters in the Summer session) or for 6 credits (both semesters in Winter session).
Prerequisites: fourth year standing (minimum of 78 credits) in the appropriate major with a minimum grade average of 72%, and approval of both the Chemistry Curriculum Committee and a faculty supervisor.

BIOC / CHEM 449: A student in Chemistry or Biochemistry 449 will gain extensive experience in the design, execution, interpretation, and reporting of original laboratory research in one or more of the major sub-disciplines of chemistry (analytical, biochemical, inorganic, organic, physical, or theoretical). A written thesis and poster describing the results of the research project will form much of the grade assessment, and will require the generation, interpretation, and communication of a body of results beyond that seen in undergraduate laboratory courses. A public thesis defence will provide the student with an opportunity to orally present and defend their research, and respond to questions about their results and general chemistry knowledge. Students will attend all departmental research seminars while enrolled in the course. Students in CHEM 449 will also receive formal project management training, to provide an understanding of key principles, techniques, and skills associated with the successful development and management of long-term projects.
Scheduling: CHEM and BIOC 449 may only be taken for 6 credits, over both semesters of Winter session.
Prerequisites: fourth year standing (minimum of 78 credits) in the appropriate major with a minimum grade average of 75%, and approval of both the Chemistry Curriculum Committee and a faculty supervisor.

Registration Procedures: Students do not register directly for any of the BIOC/CHEM 44X courses. Students must develop a project proposal with their proposed supervisor, to be submitted to the Department of Chemistry Curriculum Committee for approval, typically in late August (for a two-semester or Term 1 CHEM 447 or BIOC/CHEM 448 project, or for BIOC/CHEM 449) or December (for a Term 2 CHEM 447 or BIOC/CHEM 448 project). Students then complete a Directed Studies or Honours Thesis application form, to be signed by the student and supervisor, and submitted to the department Head along with the project proposal. The Associate Dean of Students will then register the student in the appropriate course. For a one-semester (3 credit) project, this form should be submitted to the Head no later than the first week of the semester in which the project is to be undertaken. For a two-semester (6 credit) project, this form should be submitted no later than the first week of September.

Last reviewed shim6/8/2018 4:17:12 PM